After two years in a pandemic world, we’ve all had to adapt in unexpected ways. Your home has become more than just a home. It’s a school, a doctor’s office, a salon, sometimes a circus. It’s both a place of gathering and somehow, a place to get away. But even amid what feels like chaos, these are days that we’ll miss—time at home with our loved ones, uninterrupted and full of learning. 

According to a U.S. Census Survey, the number of U.S. homeschooling households doubled during the pandemic. Meaning, parents and caregivers were now taking on pedagogical roles generally performed by teachers, in a space generally saved for rest. 

The reality is: homeschooling is hard. It is not traditional school, and it does not look like traditional school. Instead, it takes the very best elements of childhood, the love of learning for learning’s sake, and combines it with the comfort of home. It’s flexible and spontaneous, and there’s a lot of room for creativity to flourish. 

Because you are living and learning under the same roof, it’s important to have an area dedicated to the day-to-day. Part of the charm of a homeschool set up is that your space is unique to your home, as well as to your children. Creating an intentional homeschool environment will help to facilitate learning and curiosity and get your child excited for the lessons! 

Here are three workspace ideas for kids to inspire, support, and encourage active learning in your home:

1. Support multiple styles of learning
Little Boy Studying at Home
Consider different seating options to support different styles of learning: a desk, a table and chairs, and comfy chairs with a footrest can all help facilitate different tasks. The result? A more active, engaged, enthusiastic, and relaxed room. The options encourage children to move more, they’re more comfortable, and they have more fun.

2. Take advantage of unused space
Boy and Girl Doing a Science Experiment at Home
If you have an alcove or possibly a dining space you don’t use as intended, converting it to a homeschooling area may be just the perfect way to use it. And look up! Using wall space for shelves, white boards, and storage will maximize the space you have available.

3. Create an art gallery wall
Teenage Girl Attending School at Home
Creating a zone that feels special for their artwork, important papers, and accomplishments can be a great and inexpensive addition to your homeschool space. Even better? Studies show that displaying fine art can enhance children's learning.

Remember: there’s no wrong way to learn. A lot of teaching and learning will take place in the homeschool area you create and having a dedicated workspace will help to keep school and play separate… but they don’t always have to be polarized. Try taking learning beyond your homeschool setup. Go in your kitchen, then into the backyard. Baking cookies is educational when you consider the amount of math that goes into following recipes, measuring ingredients, and determining how much time is needed in the oven. Likewise, getting outside teaches children about weather patterns, growth cycles, and geology. The world is your classroom.


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